top of page

Latinx organizations calling on Congress and the Administration to support climate, justice, and clean energy infrastructure

Desiree Kane

Dear Members of Congress,


As we move from COVID relief toward economic recovery, this moment offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in a clean, resilient energy future that transitions us away from polluting fossil fuels while addressing past injustices and advancing equity. Climate action and justice cannot be sacrificed at this pivotal time.


As leading organizations within the Latino/a/x community (hereafter referred to as Latinx)—a multicultural and multiracial population—we are united in our call for a bold economic recovery, one that includes a comprehensive infrastructure package that seeks to: advance justice for communities on the frontlines of climate change and pollution; address historic wrongs by investing in healthcare, education, and water infrastructure in rural, tribal, low income, and communities of color; create union jobs that sustain families and communities while caring for our climate and our neighbors; and enable a transition to a clean energy economy that supports a sustainable future for generations to come.

Latinx communities are on the frontlines of climate change. We live in geographies with high exposure to climate hazards and are overrepresented in industries that make us susceptible to their impact, such as the agricultural and construction sectors—both vulnerable to increasing incidence of extreme heat days and wildfire smoke. Latinxs are exposed to disproportionate levels of air, water, and soil pollution, which may be compounded by extreme temperatures.  Our communities also live in communities more vulnerable to flooding, wildfires, drought and other climate-driven events. These  factors are connected to and may worsen existing economic and health disparities, which is especially worrisome because Latinxs have unequal access to quality healthcare services.


Furthermore, the compounding effect the climate crisis has on the economy and jobs only furthers the Latinx community’s commitment to supporting legislation that will mitigate its effects. Latinxs represent a significant economic engine and are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in this country. Yet when crises strike, our communities persistently encounter disproportionate economic and health impacts, something the COVID-19 pandemic has underscored: Latinxs have been hospitalized at a rate 4.1 times higher than non-Hispanic whites and 2.1 times more likely to die. We also represent a significant voting bloc concerned about the climate. A recent Yale study underscores that seven in ten Latinxs feel alarmed about climate change and that Latinxs ranked this issue among their top priorities in the last election. In addition, 83 percent of Latinxs support the transition to 100% clean energy over the next 10-15 years. Latinxs across the political spectrum believe climate change is real and want legislators to take action

Therefore, we urge you to support historic levels of investment that will safeguard our environment and livelihoods, address the impacts of climate change and pollution from fossil fuel extraction and related industries, and fulfill our moral obligation to leave a habitable world for future generations. Latinx, Black and Indigenous people, alongside low-income communities, have been hit the hardest by a trifecta of health, economic, and environmental crises. The needs of these disproportionately burdened communities must be represented in any infrastructure package.


As a community, we are united in asking you to advance infrastructure legislation that aims to:


  • Invest with justice - COVID-19 and centuries of investment in fossil fuel industries have disproportionately harmed communities of color and low-income communities. Justice demands that these communities be prioritized in infrastructure investments going forward. Specifically, we call for these communities, which have been forced to bear an unequal burden of pollution and the fallout of the pandemic, to receive at least 40% of the investments. Vehicles such as the $27 Billion Clean Energy and Sustainability Accelerator, framed with a particular focus on disadvantaged communities that have not yet benefited from clean energy investments, can advance equity and support community resilience. Investing with justice also means avoiding false solutions that may perpetuate existing inequities and inadvertently exacerbate carbon pollution, like increased plastics production to address infrastructure needs that further prop up oil and gas production while polluting frontline communities. Investments that support harmful industries like natural gas, nuclear, biomass, carbon capture and storage (CCS), and biofuels will only fuel the climate crisis and exacerbate inequities. Investment in good-paying, union jobs will empower the Latinx community to secure a just recovery from the COVID-19 crisis while ensuring fair labor practices and collective bargaining rights, immigrants’ rights, LGBTQ+ rights, and disability rights.


  • Expand clean, renewable energy and modernizing our electric grid in an equitable manner - We can accelerate the transition to clean energy by passing a national Clean Energy Standard (CES) that aims to achieve 100% renewable, pollution-free electricity—without false solutions like biomass, CCS, incineration, and gasification, among others that may lead to increased carbon pollution—2035 while expanding wind and solar power investments and energy efficiency. In developing a CES, making clean energy affordable to low- and middle-income (LMI) communities must be intentionally addressed to ensure benefits are experienced by those who need it the most. Low-income families—among whom Latinxs are overrepresented—spend 8.8% of their income on electricity, compared to 2.9% for the average American. Investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency should be accessible through programs that expand community and residential solar to reduce costs, for example. Finally, with the clean energy transition comes new jobs. Investing in equitable workforce development and jobs training programs is key. Close to half of construction laborers are Latinx, which means the community only stands to benefit from this. Many communities both hurt by and dependent on the fossil fuel industry are Latinx, so ensuring a just transition to a green economy will require incentives and investments localized in those communities where jobs and tax revenue will be lost.


  • Electrify transportation and expand public transit - Latinx workers commute by public transit nearly three times more often than their counterparts. Latinxs also live farther away from their jobs due to housing costs and many report that their transit routes are unreliable and infrequent. For example, a 20 minute commute by car might take 2 hours by bus. Workers of color are overrepresented among public transit commuters with “long commutes” of 60 minutes or longer each way. This time costs money, reducing opportunity for economic upward mobility and capacity for investment in social capital, including spending time with family, participating with local community events and organizations, and civic engagement. To address this, we must connect our communities and reduce pollution by electrifying and expanding public transit. This is particularly important for school buses, which transport 25 million children to school in the US. Most of these buses run on dirty diesel engines, spewing pollution that causes cancer, triggers asthma attacks, and makes climate change worse. Transitioning school buses to 100% electric power will help clean up the air we all breathe. Now is the time to invest in American-made electric vehicles, build charging stations and electric infrastructure in underrepresented communities—where local communities deem this to be appropriate—to enable widespread adoption and equitable access to EV technology, and ensure that EVs are affordable to all through incentives that equitably benefit and incentivize lower and middle-income buyers.


  • Expand clean water infrastructure for all communities - Too many communities, especially low-income urban neighborhoods, rural communities and Indigenous enclaves, lack access to clean and affordable water.  America’s worst public water systems serve more than 25 million Americans, among which an estimated 5.8 million are Latinx. We must invest in lead pipe remediation as well as programs that provide clean and efficient water infrastructure to all communities while prioritizing investment to the communities that are disproportionately impacted.


  • Address pollution from abandoned oil and gas wells and remediate environmental hazards - At least 1.81 million Latinxs in the U.S. live within half a mile of an oil and gas facility. These facilities, already harmful to the environmental and physical health of neighboring communities, exacerbate pollution when companies abandon wells and do not clean them up. Unplugged and orphaned wells release methane, a potent greenhouse gas and pollutant that contaminates groundwater and our air. Supporting the health of communities of color means advancing legislation that invests in remediating wells and other fossil fuel facilities, such as coal ash plants, while strengthening regulatory safeguards to ensure that the financial and health costs of this pollution are not paid by communities who cannot continue bearing these disproportionate impacts. Investments are also critical for jumpstarting remediation of toxic Superfund and brownfield sites, which are most often located near communities of color and low-income communities long considered to be “sacrifice zones”.


  • Protect and expand essential services and infrastructure needed to safeguard vulnerable communities - Recent data underscores that Latinxs in Western states are twice as likely to live in areas affected by wildfires than the rest of the population. Latinxs and other communities of color are also particularly vulnerable to flooding, alongside other climate-driven disasters, while being among the least resourced when it comes to preparing for and accessing emergency funds available following climate-driven extreme weather. Safeguarding critical infrastructure that supports vulnerable communities is crucial to strengthening resilience to climate change. Such investments should respond to specific areas of vulnerability that are unique to each community, from the electricity grid in places like Puerto Rico to resilient food systems in rural communities across the country. Programs that support pre-disaster adaptation and resilience like FEMA’s Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program should be supported but restructured with an equity lens to ensure they reduce barriers to access for the low-to-middle income communities who need them most.


  • Provide oversight to ensure FEMA’s policies do not perpetuate inequity - There is growing evidence that FEMA often helps white disaster victims more than people of color, even when encountering the same level of damage—that is not meeting its legal requirement to provide aid without discrimination on racial or other grounds, and that aid is not targeted to those most in need. Not only do individual white Americans often receive more aid from FEMA, so do the communities in which they live, according to several recent studies based on federal data. This must be addressed immediately for equity reasons, but also because of the disproportionate impact of disasters on marginalized communities. FEMA should create an "equity standard” by which to judge whether grants increase or decrease equity over time. Some means by which to achieve this include: identifying and incorporating equity-based performance measures into the process, disaggregating data by race, ethnicity, and income, and incorporating social and physical determinants of health—as defined by CDC and Healthy People 2030—into funding decision-making matrices. FEMA should also assess the current process of distributing mitigation and preparedness funds to determine which policies, regulations, and legislation need to be revised so the outcomes are more equitable.


  • Prioritize nature-based solutions to address infrastructure needs and resilience - Natural infrastructure that supports resilience while providing ecosystem services requires federal investment in the same way that hard infrastructure does. Nature distribution is unequal in America: Latinxs and other communities of color have less access to green spaces in their communities, which means inequitable access to the mental and physical wellbeing it offers. This is reflected particularly in large cities, where low-income and communities of color have less tree coverage than white neighborhoods, resulting in heat deserts that may only worsen with increasing temperatures. Nature-based solutions are an important component of climate-resilient infrastructure—from protecting forest and public lands that capture carbon dioxide to restoring coastal mangroves that reduce risk of erosion and expanding green-gray infrastructure in cities that improves community resilience.


  • Protect the workers most vulnerable to extreme heat - Whether it’s agriculture, construction, manufacturing or food processing, millions of outdoor and indoor workers across the country don’t have the luxury of working in climate-controlled settings and lack any safeguards to protect them from heat-related illness, injury or death. Among them, farmworkers are particularly vulnerable. Compared to all other civilian occupations, crop workers are 35 times more likely to die due to heat-related causes, and the majority of these deaths are among immigrant workers.


Consistent with the calls of frontline workers and the recommendations of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis, the Department of Labor (DOL) must immediately establish a heat illness standard to ensure workers are provided with training, access to potable and cool water, shade, paid rest breaks, and protocols for emergency response, among other protections.



Signed,

GreenLatinos

Poder Latinx

Hispanic Access Foundation

EcoMadres

Hispanic Federation

Corazon Latino

Acquazul

Alianza for Progress

Arizona Dream Act Coalition

Association of Young Americans

Azul

Black Millennials 4 Flint

CASA

Central Florida Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) Chapter

CHISPA Arizona

CleanAirNowKC

Climate Innovation at Movement Strategy Center

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA)

Colectivo Arbol

Colorado Latino Forum

Community Nature Connection

Comunidades Unidas

Conservación ConCiencia

Corazón Arizona (Federation of Faith in Action)

Cultivando

Defensores de la Cuenca

Defiende Nuestra Tierra

Dialogue on Diversity, Inc.

Earth Ethics, Inc.

EcoLatinos, Inc.

El Puente

Esperanza United (formerly Casa de Esperanza)

Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC)

Florida Rising

Friends of Puerto Rico

Fuerte Arts Movement

GA Familias Unidas

Hablamos Español FL

Hispanics Enjoying Camping, Hunting, and the Outdoors (HECHO)

Hispanics in Philanthropy

Justice for Migrant Women

Keep Sedona Beautiful

Latina Initiative of Colorado

LatinasRepresent

Latino Community Foundation

Latino Community Fund Inc. (LCF Georgia)

Latino Community Fund of Washington State

Latino Outdoors

Latino Victory Project

Latinxs In Sustainability

League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)

LUCHA

Make the Road Nevada

MANA, A National Latina Organization

Mariposas Sin Fronteras

Mi Familia Vota

Mi Vecino

Migrant Equity Southeast (MESE)

Mijente

Modern Immigrant

National Association Of Hispanic Federal Executives

National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators (NHCSL)

National Hispanic Medical Association

National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts

National Latino Farmers & Ranchers Trade Association

New Georgia Project

Nuestra Tierra Conservation Project

Orlando Center for Justice

Poder in Action

Poder NC

Presente.org

Prosperity Now

Protégete, Conservation Colorado

Pulso

QLATINX

Sachamama

Society of Native Nations

Somos Votantes

Somos Seattle

Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA)

The Arizona Students' Association

The Center For Cultural Power

The CLEO Institute

United for a New Economy

United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Utah Coalition of La Raza

Verde

Voces Unidas de las Montañas

Voces Unidas Action Fund

Voto Latino

---


Estimados miembros del Congreso:


Mientras hacemos una transición de los esfuerzos de socorro por el COVID hacia una recuperación económica, el presente momento nos ofrece una oportunidad que es única en nuestra generación para invertir en un futuro de energía limpia y resiliente que nos aleje de los combustibles fósiles contaminantes mientras también enfrentamos las injusticias del pasado y adelantamos la equidad. La acción y la justicia climática no se puede sacrificar en este momento cumbre.

Como organizaciones representantes de latinos, latinas y latinxs en los EEUU. (en adelante, la comunidad latina) ―una población multicultural y multirracial― estamos unidos en nuestro llamado para una recuperación económica contundente que incluya un paquete integral de infraestructura. Este debe procurar adelantar la justicia para las comunidades que sufren los peores embates del cambio climático y de la contaminación; abordar las injusticias históricas al invertir en cuidado médico, educación e infraestructura del agua en comunidades rurales, tribales, de bajos ingresos y comunidades discriminadas por motivos raciales o étnicos; crear empleos unionados que sostengan a familias y comunidades mientras que cuide de nuestro clima y a nuestros vecinos; y que apoye un futuro sostenible para las generaciones venideras.

Comunidades latinas están en la primera línea del cambio climático. Vivimos en lugares geográficos que sufren de una gran exposición a los peligros climáticos que están sobrerrepresentados en las industrias que nos hacen susceptibles a su efecto, tales como los sectores agrícolas y de la construcción; y ambos son vulnerables a la incidencia en alza de días de calor extremo, así como al humo de los incendios forestales. Las personas latinas están expuestas a unos niveles desproporcionados de contaminación del aire, del agua y del suelo, lo que pudiera incrementar con las temperaturas extremas. Nuestras comunidades también viven en lugares que son más vulnerables a las inundaciones, incendios forestales, sequías y otros eventos causados por el cambio climático. Estos factores están vinculados y pueden empeorar a raíz de las disparidades económicas y de salud existentes, lo que es particularmente preocupante ya que la comunidad latina tiene un acceso desigual a los servicios de cuidado de la salud.

Además, el efecto dominó que tiene la crisis climática sobre la economía y los empleos solo fortalece el compromiso de la comunidad latina con apoyar proyectos de ley que mitiguen los daños. Las personas latinas representan un motor económico significativo y son uno de los grupos étnicos con mayor crecimiento en este país. Sin embargo, cuando llegan las crisis, nuestras comunidades se topan persistentemente con efectos económicos y salud desproporcionados, algo que la pandemia del COVID-19 ha recrudecido: las personas latinas han sido hospitalizadas a una razón 4.1 veces más alta que los blancos que no son hispanos, y son 2.1 veces más propensos a morir. También representamos un bloque electoral considerable que está preocupado por el clima. Un estudio reciente de la Universidad de Yale subrayó que siete de cada diez personas latinas están alarmadas por el cambio climático y que los latinxs enumeraron este asunto entre sus principales prioridades en las elecciones pasadas. Asimismo, el 83 por ciento de los latinxs apoyan la transición hacia una energía 100% limpia en los próximos 10-15 años. Las personas latinas de todo el espectro político creen que el cambio climático es real y quieren que los políticos tomen acción.


Por lo tanto, les exhortamos a que apoyen los niveles históricos de inversiones que salvaguardarán nuestro medioambiente y sustentos, a que enfrenten los efectos del cambio climático y de la contaminación por la extracción de combustibles fósiles y de las industrias relacionadas, y a que cumplan con la obligación moral que tenemos de dejar un mundo habitable para las generaciones futuras. Las personas latinas, negras, indígenas y otras comunidades discriminadas por motivos raciales o étnicos, así como las comunidades de bajos recursos, han sufrido lo peor debido al trío de crisis de salud, economía y medioambiente. Las necesidades de estas comunidades desproporcionadamente afectadas deben representarse en cualquier paquete de infraestructura.


Como comunidad nos unimos para pedirles que impulsen leyes de infraestructura que aspiren a:


Invertir con justicia

El COVID-19 y los siglos de invertir en industrias de combustibles fósiles han afectado desproporcionadamente a las comunidades discriminadas por motivo de raza o etnia, así como a las comunidades de bajos ingresos. La justicia exige que estas comunidades sean la prioridad en las inversiones en infraestructura que se hagan en el futuro. Hacemos un llamado específico para que estas comunidades, que han estado obligadas a cargar con el peso desigual de la contaminación y de los efectos de la pandemia, reciban al menos el 40% de las inversiones. Las vías como la Ley del Acelerador de Energía Limpia y Sostenibilidad (Clean Energy and Sustainability Accelerator Act), que cuenta con un presupuesto de $27 mil millones, y que están enfocadas particularmente en las comunidades desventajadas que todavía no se han beneficiado de las inversiones de energía limpia, pueden impulsar la equidad y apoyar la resiliencia comunitaria. Invertir con justicia también significa evitar falsas soluciones que pueden perpetuar las desigualdades inexistentes y exacerbar inadvertidamente la contaminación con carbono, como la mayor producción de plástico para lidiar con las necesidades de infraestructura, ya que esto aumenta incluso más la producción de petróleo y gas y contamina a las comunidades de las primeras líneas. Las inversiones que apoyan las industrias dañinas como el gas natural, la energía nuclear, la biomasa, la captura y almacenamiento de carbono, y los biocombustibles solo aumentarán la crisis climática y exacerbarán las desigualdades. La inversión en empleos sindicalizados y bien remunerados empoderará a la comunidad latina garantizar una recuperación justa de la crisis de COVID-19, al tiempo que se garantizan las prácticas laborales justas y derechos de negociación colectivas, derechos de los inmigrantes, derechos para los miembros de la comunidad LGBTQ+, y derechos de las personas con discapacidades.


Expandir la energía limpia y renovable y modernizar nuestra red eléctrica de forma equitativa

Podemos acelerar la transición hacia una energía limpia si aprobamos un Parámetro Nacional de Energía Limpia (CES, por sus siglas en inglés) que procure lograr una electricidad 100% renovable y libre de contaminación, y que no dependa de soluciones falsas como la biomasa, la captura y secuestro de carbono, la incineración y la gasificación, ni de ningún otro que pueda causar más contaminación con carbono. Esto se podría lograr para el 2035 si expandimos las inversiones en energía eólica y solar y la eficiencia energética. Al desarrollar un CES, se hace que la energía limpia sea asequible para las comunidades de bajos y medios ingresos de forma intencional y se asegure que los beneficios los experimenten aquellos que más lo necesitan. Las familias de bajos ingresos ―en las que las personas latinas están sobrerrepresentadas― gastan 8.8% de su ingreso en electricidad, en comparación con el 2.9% del estadounidense promedio. Las inversiones en energía limpia y en la eficiencia energética deben ser accesibles mediante programas que aumenten la energía solar comunitaria y residencial para poder reducir los costos, por ejemplo. Finalmente, con la transición hacia una energía limpia llegan nuevos empleos. Invertir en el desarrollo equitativo de una fuerza laboral y de programas de capacitación para empleos es clave. Cerca de la mitad de los trabajadores de la construcción son de la comunidad latina, lo que significa que para la comunidad esto solo sería algo beneficioso. Muchas comunidades que sufren y a la vez dependen de la industria de los combustibles fósiles son personas latinas, así que asegurar una transición justa hacia una economía verde requerirá de incentivos e inversiones en esas comunidades en las que se perderán los empleos e ingresos tributarios.


Electrificar el transporte y aumentar la transportación pública

Los trabajadores de la comunidad latina viajan a su lugar de trabajo en transporte público en una tasa tres veces mayor que sus contrapartes. También viven más lejos de sus trabajos debido a los costos de vivienda y muchos informan que sus rutas de transportación no son confiables y son infrecuentes. Por ejemplo, un viaje de 20 minutos en auto pudiera tomar dos horas en autobús. Los trabajadores de comunidades discriminadas por motivo de raza o etnia son sobrerrepresentados entre aquellas personas que usan el transporte público con viajes “largos” de 60 minutos o más por cada vía. Este tiempo cuesta dinero y reduce la oportunidad para que se dé una movilidad económica ascendente y para que haya capacidad de inversión en el capital social; esto a su vez incluye perder tiempo familiar, de participar de eventos y organizaciones comunitarias, y de involucrarse cívicamente. Para enfrentar esto debemos conectar nuestras comunidades y reducir la contaminación al electrificar y expandir el transporte público. Esto es especialmente importante para los autobuses escolares, que transportan a 25 millones de niños a la escuela en Estados Unidos. La mayoría de estos autobuses funcionan con motores diésel sucios, que contaminan y provocan cáncer, ataques de asma y empeoran el cambio climático. La transición de los autobuses escolares al 100% de energía eléctrica ayudará a limpiar el aire que todos respiramos. Este es el momento de invertir en vehículos eléctricos fabricados en los Estados Unidos, construir estaciones de recarga  e infraestructura eléctrica en comunidades poco representadas -donde las comunidades locales lo consideren apropiado- para permitir la adopción generalizada y el acceso equitativo a la tecnología de los vehículos eléctricos, y asegurarse de que los vehículos eléctricos son asequibles para todos mediante incentivos que beneficien equitativamente e incentivan a los compradores de bajos y medianos ingresos.


Expandir la infraestructura de agua limpia para todas las comunidades

Demasiadas comunidades, especialmente aquellas en vecindarios urbanos de bajos ingresos, las comunidades rurales, y los pueblos indígenas, carecen de acceso a agua limpia y asequible.  Los peores sistemas de acueductos públicos de los Estados Unidos le sirven a más de 25 millones de estadounidenses, y se estima que 5.8 millones de estos son de la comunidad latina. Debemos invertir en la reparación de las tuberías de plomo, así como en programas que provean una infraestructura de agua que sea limpia y eficiente para todas las comunidades a la vez que se le da prioridad a las inversiones en las comunidades que sufren de un impacto desproporcionado.


Atajar la contaminación de pozos abandonados de petróleo y gas y remediar los peligros ambientales

Al menos 1.81 millones de personas de la comunidad latina viven a menos de media milla de distancia de una instalación de petróleo y gas. Estas instalaciones, que ya son nocivas para la salud ambiental y física de las comunidades aledañas, exacerban la contaminación cuando las compañías abandonan los pozos y no los limpian. Los pozos destapados y desatendidos liberan metano, un gas de invernadero y contaminante potente que contamina tanto el agua como el aire. Apoyar la salud de las comunidades discriminadas por motivo de raza o etnia significa impulsar leyes que inviertan en remediar los pozos y otras instalaciones de combustibles fósiles, como plantas de cenizas de carbón, y también fortalecer los parámetros regulatorios para asegurar que los costos económicos y de salud de la contaminación no son pagados por las comunidades que no pueden seguir soportando estos impactos desproporcionados. Las inversiones también son cruciales para comenzar la remediación de los sitios tóxicos de superfondos y abandonados, que a menudo están ubicados cerca de estas comunidades y de las comunidades de bajo impacto que se han considerado por mucho tiempo como “zonas de sacrificio”.


Proteger y aumentar los servicios esenciales y la infraestructura necesaria para salvaguardar a las comunidades vulnerables

Los datos recientes recalcan que las personas de la comunidad latina que habitan en estados del Oeste tienen el doble de probabilidad que el resto de la población de vivir en lugares afectados por incendios forestales. Estas personas y las que provienen de otras comunidades discriminadas por su raza o etnia son particularmente vulnerables a las inundaciones y a otros desastres causados por el clima y, a su vez, son las que menos recursos tienen para prepararse y acceder a fondos de emergencia que están disponibles luego de un clima extremo causado por el clima. Proteger la infraestructura crucial que apoya a las comunidades vulnerables es fundamental para fortalecer la resiliencia ante el cambio climático. Estas inversiones deben responder a lugares específicos vulnerables que son únicos de cada comunidad, desde el tendido eléctrico en lugares como Puerto Rico, hasta los sistemas alimentarios resilientes en las comunidades de todo el país. Los programas que apoyan la adaptación y la resiliencia antes de los desastres, como el programa Construir Infraestructura y Comunidades Resilientes de FEMA (BRIC, por sus siglas en inglés) deberían ser apoyados, pero restructurados con una perspectiva equitativa para asegurarse de que se reduzcan las barreras de acceso a las comunidades de ingresos bajos a medianos que más lo necesitan.


Supervisar que las pólizas de FEMA no perpetúen la inequidad

Existe una creciente evidencia de que FEMA a menudo ayuda a las víctimas blancas de desastres más que a las personas latinas, negras, indígenas y otras comunidades discriminadas por motivos raciales o étnicos, incluso cuando se encuentran con el mismo nivel de daño. Tambien la evidencia muestra que no cumple con su requisito legal de brindar ayuda sin discriminación por motivos raciales u otros y que la ayuda no es dirigido a los más necesitados. No sólo los estadounidenses de raza blanca suelen recibir más ayuda de la FEMA, sino también las comunidades en las que viven, según varios estudios recientes basados en datos federales. Esto debe abordarse de inmediato por razones de equidad, pero también debido al impacto desproporcionado de los desastres en las comunidades marginadas. FEMA debe crear un "estándar de equidad" para juzgar si las subvenciones aumentan o disminuyen la equidad con el tiempo. Algunos medios para lograrlo son: identificar e incorporar al proceso medidas de rendimiento basadas en la equidad, desglosar los datos por raza, etnia e ingresos, e incorporar los determinantes sociales y físicos de la salud -tal como los definen los CDC y Healthy People 2030- a las matrices de toma de decisiones de financiación.FEMA también debe evaluar el proceso actual de distribución de fondos de mitigación y preparación para determinar qué políticas, regulaciones y leyes deben ser revisadas para que los resultados sean más equitativos.


Darles prioridad a las soluciones basadas en la naturaleza para cumplir con las necesidades y resiliencia de las infraestructuras

La infraestructura nacional que apoya la resiliencia mientras provee servicios ecosistémicos requiere de una inversión federal de la misma forma que lo necesita la infraestructura sólida. La distribución de naturaleza es desigual en los Estados Unidos: las comunidades latinas y otras comunidades discriminadas por motivo de raza o etnia tienen menos acceso a espacios verdes en sus comunidades, lo que hace que el acceso al bienestar mental y físico que ofrecen sea desigual. Esto se refleja particularmente en las ciudades grandes, donde las comunidades de bajos ingresos y racializadas tienen menos cubierta forestal que los vecindarios blancos, lo que causa desiertos de calor que solo aumentarán con el incremento en temperaturas. Las soluciones fundamentadas en la naturaleza son un componente importante de la infraestructura resiliente al clima; desde proteger los bosques y las tierras públicas que capturan el dióxido de carbono, hasta restaurar los mangles costeros que reducen el riesgo de erosión y expandir la infraestructura verde y gris en las ciudades para mejorar la resiliencia comunitaria.


Protección para los trabajadores más vulnerables al calor extremo

Ya sea en la agricultura, la construcción, la manufactura o el procesamiento de alimentos, existen millones de personas trabajadoras que laboran en exteriores y en interiores en todo el país y que no tienen el lujo de trabajar en lugares climatizados. Además, carecen de cualquier medida que les proteja de enfermedades, lesiones o muertes relacionadas con el calor. De estos, los trabajadores agrícolas están particularmente en riesgo. En comparación con el resto de las ocupaciones civiles, los trabajadores de los cultivos son veinte veces más propensos a morir por causas relacionadas con el calor. La mayoría de estas muertes ocurren entre trabajadores inmigrantes.

En línea con los llamados de los trabajadores de primera línea y con las recomendaciones del Comité Selecto de la Cámara sobre la Crisis Climática, el Departamento del Trabajo (DOL, por sus siglas en inglés) debe inmediatamente establecer parámetros en cuanto a las enfermedades por calor para asegurar que a los trabajadores se les provea la capacitación necesaria, el acceso a agua potable y fresca, sombra, tiempo de descanso pago y protocolos para la respuesta a emergencias, así como otras protecciones.


Atentamente,

GreenLatinos

Poder Latinx

Hispanic Access Foundation

EcoMadres

Hispanic Federation

Corazon Latino

Acquazul

Alianza for Progress

Arizona Dream Act Coalition

Association of Young Americans

Azul

Black Millennials 4 Flint

CASA

Central Florida Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) Chapter

CHISPA Arizona

CleanAirNowKC

Climate Innovation at Movement Strategy Center

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA)

Colectivo Arbol

Colorado Latino Forum

Community Nature Connection

Comunidades Unidas

Conservación ConCiencia

Corazón Arizona (Federation of Faith in Action)

Cultivando

Defensores de la Cuenca

Defiende Nuestra Tierra

Dialogue on Diversity, Inc.

Earth Ethics, Inc.

EcoLatinos, Inc.

El Puente

Esperanza United (formerly Casa de Esperanza)

Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC)

Florida Rising

Friends of Puerto Rico

Fuerte Arts Movement

GA Familias Unidas

Hablamos Español FL

Hispanics Enjoying Camping, Hunting, and the Outdoors (HECHO)

Hispanics in Philanthropy

Justice for Migrant Women

Keep Sedona Beautiful

Latina Initiative of Colorado

LatinasRepresent

Latino Community Foundation

Latino Community Fund Inc. (LCF Georgia)

Latino Community Fund of Washington State

Latino Outdoors

Latino Victory Project

Latinxs In Sustainability

League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)

LUCHA

Make the Road Nevada

MANA, A National Latina Organization

Mariposas Sin Fronteras

Mi Familia Vota

Mi Vecino

Migrant Equity Southeast (MESE)

Mijente

Modern Immigrant

National Association Of Hispanic Federal Executives

National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators (NHCSL)

National Hispanic Medical Association

National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts

National Latino Farmers & Ranchers Trade Association

New Georgia Project

Nuestra Tierra Conservation Project

Orlando Center for Justice

Poder in Action

Poder NC

Presente.org

Prosperity Now

Protégete, Conservation Colorado

Pulso

QLATINX

Sachamama

Society of Native Nations

Somos Votantes

Somos Seattle

Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA)

The Arizona Students' Association

The Center For Cultural Power

The CLEO Institute

United for a New Economy

United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Utah Coalition of La Raza

Verde

Voces Unidas de las Montañas

Voces Unidas Action Fund

Voto Latino

bottom of page